Learn how to make roux~!

Hello, I decided to do an occasional article that may not merit a video, some quick tips or techniques or other information that would be helpful to you. Some of these articles are from one of my old websites that I thought would be helpful to you here. This article is one of those. Let me know what you think of these articles.

Roux is a thickener using equal amounts of flour and fat. It is the most common thickener used for soups sauces and gravies. To make it you melt vegan margarine or heat up oil and then add the flour and cook it over low heat for at least 5-10 minutes to cook out the gluten flavor out of the flour. You then slowly add in the liquid stirring constantly. Then you cook it down until you get the consistency you are looking for. You can make a large batch of roux and then refrigerate or freeze until needed. If you are watching your fat intake you can take some flour and slowly toast it as well. There are several different kinds of roux and you use them according to what you are trying to cook and accomplish color and flavor wise. A pale, or blonde roux should be straw-colored, A brown or black roux will be deep in color, have a nutty aroma, and is used in brown sauces and Cajun cooking.

White roux is cooked just long enough to get rid of the raw taste and the gluten of the flour. Usually 8 – 10 minutes over medium heat.

White roux
White roux

blonde roux is cooked to a pale golden color; 10 – 12 minutes over medium heat.
blonde roux
blonde roux


brown roux is cooked until a light brown color is obtained (used in demi-glace, Espagnole, etc.) usually 15 – 18 minutes over medium-low heat.
brown roux
brown roux

Créole brown roux is cooked more than the French brown roux. It is used as a thickener, but because it is cooked longer, does add some flavor. Its color begins where the lighter roux ends.
Créole brown roux
Créole brown roux

It is with Cajun cooking that roux really comes into its own. Cajun roux can be from light brown to a very deep, dark, nutty brown. Roux is used in Cajun cuisine for flavor rather than for thickening. When the roux is cooked to a dark brown, it loses much of its thickening power, but gains a rich, deep nutty flavor. This dark brown, nutty roux is the basis for many classic Cajun dishes, adding a unique richness and depth. It is the secret ingredient in Cajun food. 20 – 25 minutes over medium-low heat
Créole dark brown roux
Créole dark brown roux
Créole deep dark brown roux
Créole deep dark brown roux

Créole deep dark brown roux
Créole deep dark brown roux

A browned-flour roux has one-third the thickening power of other roux and is often used more to enhance color and flavor than to thicken the sauce.

Slow cooking and constant stirring are critical in making roux. There are two possible consequences that can come from leaving the roux even for a brief moment: it can scorch, which will make the roux bitter and unusable, and it can break, which means the fat will begin separating from the flour.

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